Further Events

FCRC has held many events since it began. Many are directly related to the victims of racial terror lynching identified by EJI, and those are documented on the pages for each historical event. We are also actively engaged in broader conversations and action with our community, shown in this selected list of events.

Lives Taken,

Lives Remembered

Receptions

Saturday, January 29, 12 pm - 4 pm

Gallery 992

992 Ralph David Abernathy Blvd, Atlanta, GA 30310

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Saturday, February 19, 5 pm - 7 pm

Roswell River Landing

245 Azalea Dr, Roswell, GA 30075


The Stories of Racial Terror told in Fabric.

Quilts for the 36 documented victims of lynching in Fulton County

Honoring Resilience & Remembering Brownsville

September 21, 2021

We will begin near South Atlanta Park for a welcome address from FCRC and our partners. The first 60 people to arrive will receive headphones to listen to a recording of the Atlanta Massacre. While listening and reflecting we will walk to Community Grounds to gather for a community conversation on why the Atlanta Massacre was not a “race riot” and the historical marker FCRC hopes to install in the Brownsville/South Atlanta community.

Our purpose is to remember the 25 Black men and women who we know lost their lives and the countless others whose stories we may never hear; to honor the resilience of the Brownsville Community; and to learn from this historic violence and injustice about how to better address what we are facing today.

This event is free and open to the public. Physical distancing and masks will be required.

Photography and Videography: We will have a photographer and videographer present. By attending this event, you give your permission to have your image used by FCRC. If you do not want your image used, please let us know when you arrive at the event.

Anti-Racism and Local History: Why the Atlanta Massacre was not a “race riot”

September 19, 2021

In light of Covid-19 and its disparate effects on communities of color, conversations about race and equity are more necessary than ever.

Join us for the next Equitable Dinners: Lift Every Voice on Sunday, September 19 with a focus on Anti-Racism and Local History: Why the Atlanta Massacre was not a “Race Riot” featuring playwright, Pedro Alvarado, speaker King Williams, and breakout discussions with trained facilitators.

Equitable Dinners: Lift Every Voice is a series of online conversations, featuring guest speakers on a range of topics, and launched by a short play. Equitable Dinners: Lift Every Voice will take place one Sunday a month from 5:00 to 7:00 PM.

EJI (DeKalb) Marker Dedication Ceremony

March 29, 2020

Join the Dekalb Remembrance Project on March 29, 2020 as they unveil a historical marker memorializing DeKalb County’s lynching victims. The marker will honor:

  • Reuben Hudson, Jr., who was murdered July 26, 1887 in Redan, Georgia

  • Three to five unnamed black men, who were murdered in Lithonia, GA on April 3, 1892

  • Porter F. Turner, who was murdered by the KKK in a Druid Hills neighborhood

Just Mercy – A Story of Justice and Redemption

January 10, 2020

True Justice examines the personal journey of Bryan Stevenson, director of the Equal Justice Initiative, who is working to bring justice to the incarcerated, wrongly convicted, and disadvantaged.

Following the screening, FCRC will lead a discussion on the film and our engagement in EJI’s Community Remembrance Project to confront our history and remember the 36 victims of racial terror lynching in Fulton County.

Photography and Videography: We will have a photographer and videographer present. By attending this event, you give your permission to have your image used by FCRC. If you do not want your image used, please let us know when you check to the event.

FREE SCREENING of True Justice: Bryan Stevenson’s Fight for Equality

February 9, 2020

Compassionate Atlanta is pleased to present a viewing of “Just Mercy” on opening night, January 10, 2020. This fundraiser will support the Dekalb County NAACP Remembrance Project & the Fulton County Remembrance Coalition.

Please stay for a short discussion after the movie.

Always in Season Screening with FCRC

October 9, 2019

Join us to learn about Claudia Lacy’s quest for justice following the hanging death of her son Lennon. Filmmaker Jacqueline Olive’s, Sundance Film Festival award-winning documentary Always in Season confronts the trauma of more than a century of lynching African Americans as it bleeds into the present.

*Featuring Q&As with the director, cast, and community leaders all week long!

ALWAYS IN SEASON explores the lingering impact of more than a century of lynching African Americans and connects this form of historic racial terrorism to racial violence today. The film centers on the case of Lennon Lacy, an African American teen who was found hanging from a swing set in Bladenboro, North Carolina, on August 29, 2014. Despite inconsistencies in the case, local officials quickly ruled Lennon’s death a suicide, but his mother, Claudia, believes Lennon was lynched. Claudia moves from paralyzing grief to leading the fight for justice for her son.

As the film unfolds, Lennon’s case, and the suspicions surrounding it, intersect with stories of other communities seeking justice and reconciliation. A few hundred miles away in Monroe, Georgia, a diverse group of reenactors, including the adult daughter of a former Ku Klux Klan leader, annually dramatize a 1946 quadruple lynching to ensure the victims are never forgotten and encourage the community to come forward with information that might bring the perpetrators to justice. As the terrorism of the past bleeds into the present, the film asks: what will it take for Americans to begin building a national movement for racial justice and reconciliation?

Facebook event link

Book Discussion of “The Cross and the Lynching Tree” followed by Pilgrimage to Montgomery

August 7, 2019

The Cathedral will be chartering a bus to Montgomery, and our first stop in the morning will be the Memorial for Peace and Justice (which is outdoors). More than 4400 African American men, women, and children were hanged, burned alive, shot, drowned, and beaten to death by white mobs between 1877 and 1950. Millions more fled the South as refugees from racial terrorism, profoundly impacting the entire nation. Until now, there has been no national memorial acknowledging the victims of racial terror lynchings. On a six-acre site atop a rise overlooking Montgomery, the national lynching memorial is a sacred space for truth-telling and reflection about racial terror in America and its legacy.

American men, women, and children were hanged, burned alive, shot, drowned, and beaten to death by white mobs between 1877 and 1950. Millions more fled the South as refugees from racial terrorism, profoundly impacting the entire nation. Until now, there has been no national memorial acknowledging the victims of racial terror lynchings. On a six-acre site atop a rise overlooking Montgomery, the national lynching memorial is a sacred space for truth-telling and reflection about racial terror in America and its legacy.

We’ll have lunch and a tour at St. John’s Episcopal Church, then the bus will take us to the Legacy Museum. Located on the site of a former warehouse where black people were enslaved in Montgomery, Alabama, this narrative museum uses interactive media, sculpture, videography and exhibits to immerse visitors in the sights and sounds of the domestic slave trade, racial terrorism, the Jim Crow South, and the world’s largest prison system. Compelling visuals and data-rich exhibits provide a one-of-a-kind opportunity to investigate America’s history of racial injustice and its legacy — to draw dynamic connections across generations of Americans impacted by the tragic history of racial inequality.

Cathedral clergy and staff will lead the pilgrimage, including liturgies and discussion, to help you process this powerful day.

It will also be a very long day, and will probably not be enjoyable for children. However, it’s a great opportunity for parents to learn more in order to plan a visit later with their children. And, Saturday, October 19 Cathedral Youth and parents, grandparents, and teachers will make the pilgrimage. Watch the Cathedral Youth News for more information!

Southern Truth and Reconciliation Link

Conversations With a Curator

Monthly 2019-2020

Join us for informal conversations surrounding the Stories From the Soil exhibit! Learn about its origins and meaning, engage with the narrative of a victim represented there, and share your own stories of how this affects you.

Red Summer: Talkback with Artist Wendel White

July 31, 2019

Artist talkback with photographer and historian Wendel White, in partnership with Atlanta Celebrates Photography. 2019 marks the 100th commemoration of Red Summer, a period of time where America was rocked by “anti-black” riots and lynchings directly following WWI.

Below Baldwin: Unearthing a University’s Legacy of Slavery

June 30, 2019

The Auburn Avenue Research Library, in collaboration with Enlightened Media Productions, presents the documentary “Below Baldwin: How an Expansion Project Unearthed a University’s Legacy of Slavery”.

On November 17, 2015, construction on Baldwin Hall on the University of Georgia campus came to a halt when workers uncovered human remains on the site. DNA tests revealed what many local residents already knew to be true: these were the remains of former slaves. This uncovering and the events that followed have forced the often-omitted histories of slavery and segregation to rise to the surface, both at the University of Georgia and in Athens.

“Below Baldwin”, featuring Fred Smith, Linda Davis, Alvin Sheats, Linda Lloyd, Mariah Parker, Broderick Flanigan, and others, chronicles the series of events between November 2015 and today. But more than that – this documentary showcases a community’s persistent efforts to connect to its past, and to win recognition and redress – for both past and present injustices.

Facebook event link

The Impact of a Narrative: Panel Discussion

March 29, 2019

Thank you to the Auburn Avenue Research Library for live streaming this event.

A Conversation About History, Trauma, Activism, and Restorative Justice.

The Fulton County Remembrance Coalition (FCRC) has partnered with The Equal Justice Initiative to engage our community in a process of reconciliation with our history of racial terrorism. FCRC is committed to fostering a lasting dialogue founded on truth and justice, collecting soil at the sites of Fulton County’s 35 documented racial terror lynchings, erecting historical markers, and claiming our monument from the National Memorial for Peace and Justice.

To spark a lasting dialogue that is honest in confronting our history of racial terrorism and constructive in reconciling with this past, FCRC, in collaboration with The Auburn Avenue Research Library, is hosting a panel discussion. The panel will serve as a model of how such conversations can look and will consist of experts in trauma, restorative justice, history, and activism. With this range of experts, the discussion is sure to cover the root causes of this problem, symptoms, interventions, and potential solutions. Join us in fostering this dialogue within the community!

Moderator

Lyn May began her journalism career in Boston, Massachusetts, where she was a producer, reporter and news anchor. She served as press secretary, deputy director and director of communications during Mayor Maynard Jackson’s third term. Lyn was director of domestic media relations and a member of the crisis management team for the 1996 Olympic Committee. She is a freelance contributor and interviewer for various PBS programs.

History

Doug Blackmon is the Pulitzer-Prize winning author of Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II, and co-executive producer of the acclaimed PBS documentary of the same name. Blackmon has written extensively over the past 30 years about the American quandary of race–exploring the integration of schools during his childhood in a Mississippi Delta farm town, lost episodes of the Civil Rights movement, and, repeatedly, the dilemma of how a contemporary society should grapple with a troubled past.

Trauma

Julia Bantimba is currently working to integrate best practices for trauma-related disorders into the non-public school settings at Seneca Family of Agencies in the San Francisco Bay Area. She received her Master’s in Occupational Therapy from Boston University before moving to the Bay area to begin her career. Julia serves as the advisory board chair for the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship and is a faculty presenter at the Napa Infant Parent Mental Health Fellowship and Certificate Program. She is also certified in the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics and provides trainings around the country.

Activism

Nikki Roberts is an author, public speaker, activist, and returning citizen, who’s studied both Mass Communications and Theology on collegiate levels. Nikki served 10 years without parole in Georgia’s Department of Corrections from 2004 – 2014 and frequently uses her lived experiences as well as systemic research to raise awareness on the myriad of issues associated with Mass Incarceration. Nikki is also under book-contract with Fortress Press working on her soon-to-be released memoir “Freed From Within”.

Restorative Justice

David Hooker is currently an Associate Professor of the Practice of Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding at the University of Notre Dame and a core faculty member of the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies. For more than 30 years, he has practiced conflict transformation as mediator, community builder, scholar, and advocate with communities, governments, civil society organizations, and international NGOs. Hooker’s areas of expertise include post-conflict community building, environmental justice, and other issues of public policy and social justice.

Reception with hors d’oeuvres will begin at 6 p.m., followed by the panel discussion at 7 p.m.

Photography and Videography: We will have a photographer and videographer present. By attending this event, you give your permission to have your image used by FCRC. If you do not want your image used, please let us know when you check to the event.

Free Screening of “I Am Not Your Negro”

March 27, 2019

The Fulton County Remembrance Coalition (FCRC) has partnered with The Equal Justice Initiative to engage our community in a process of reconciliation with our history of racial terrorism. FCRC is committed to fostering a lasting dialogue founded on truth and justice, collecting soil at the sites of Fulton County’s 35 documented racial terror lynchings, erecting historical markers, and claiming our monument from the National Memorial for Peace and Justice.

To begin this process of reconciliation, FCRC, in collaboration with The Auburn Avenue Research Library, will host a screening of Raoul Peck’s award winning documentary, “I Am Not Your Negro”, followed by a community discussion. Based on James Baldwin’s unfinished manuscript, “Remember This House”, and narrated by actor Samuel L. Jackson, this powerful film explores the history of racism in the United States through Baldwin’s reminiscences of civil rights leaders Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr., as well as his personal observations of American history.

Reception with light refreshments will begin at 6 p.m. Introduction to the film will begin at 6:45. The film will begin promptly at 7 p.m. Following the screening, attendees will participate in facilitated group discussions.

Photography and Videography: We will have a photographer and videographer present. By attending this event, you give your permission to have your image used by FCRC. If you do not want your image used, please let us know when you check to the event.